eISSN: 2345-6558

Free Access

Journal of Parathyroid Disease 2016;4(2):40-43
Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level in diabetic patients versus normal individuals; a pilot study
 


Original

Marzieh Kafeshani 1, Mahtab Zarafshani 2, Sara Shokri-Moghaddam 2, Ali Ahmadi 3, Hamid Nasri 2 *

1 Food Security Research Center and Department of Clinical Nutrition/Community Nutrition/Food Science & Technology, School of Nutrition & Food
2 Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
3 Nickan Research Institute, Isfahan, Iran.
4 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran.


*Corresponding author: Professor Hamid Nasri,
Email: hamidnasri@med.mui.ac.ir


Abstract

Introduction: Vitamin D deficiency is a common health problem throughout the world. There is growing interest in vitamin D status as a potentially adjustable risk factor for diabetes mellitus.

Objectives: The main aim of this investigation is to assess, the possible differences of vitamin D serum value of diabetics versus normal persons.

Patients and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional investigation was conducted on 106 persons (females; 44, males; 62) consisting of 75 subjects, were free of any diseases who had normal fasting blood sugar (FBS) and 31 type 2 diabetic patients. Blood level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH) D] was FBS, 2-hour postprandial blood sugar (2-h PPBS), calcium, creatinine, and uric acid were measured using standard kits. The independent t test was used to determine the significance of any baseline differences between groups and Pearson correlation test was used to assess correlations by STATA software version 12.

Results: The mean serum 25(OH) D concentration was 27.44± 3.66 and 27.64 ± 5.62 nmol/l in diabetics, and normal persons respectively. There was any significant difference in serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level between diabetic and normal individuals. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/l) was 88.87% in diabetic and 92% in normal subjects respectively.

Conclusion: The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was high in two groups, however, there was not any significant difference in serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level between diabetics and normal individuals.

 


Notes

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education

In a cross-sectional investigation on 106 persons consisting
of 75 normal subjects, 31 type 2 diabetic patients, we
found the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was high in
two groups but there was not any significant difference in
serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level between diabetic and
normal individuals. However, this finding requires further
investigation. 

Please cite this paper as: Kafeshani M, Zarafshani M, Shokri-Moghaddam S, Ahmadi A, Nasri H. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level in diabetic patients versus normal individuals; a pilot study. J Parathyr Dis. 2016;4(2):40-43.

Please cite this paper as: Kafeshani M, Zarafshani M, Shokri-Moghaddam S, Ahmadi A, Nasri H. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level in diabetic patients versus normal individuals; a pilot study. J Parathyr Dis. 2016;4(2):40-43.
Please cite this paper as: Kafeshani M, Zarafshani M, Shokri-Moghaddam S, Ahmadi A, Nasri H. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level in diabetic patients versus normal individuals; a pilot study. J Parathyr Dis. 2016;4(2):40-43.
 
 

 

Comments
First name  
Last name  
Email address  
Comments  
Security code



Article
PDF


Export citation
EndNote
Reference Manager
BibTeX
Medlars
Refworks

Cite by
Google Scholar

Google Scholar
Articles by Marzieh Kafeshani
Articles by Mahtab Zarafshani
Articles by Sara Shokri-Moghaddam
Articles by Ali Ahmadi
Articles by Hamid Nasri
Similar articles
Related articles

PubMed
Articles by Marzieh Kafeshani
Articles by Mahtab Zarafshani
Articles by Sara Shokri-Moghaddam
Articles by Ali Ahmadi
Articles by Hamid Nasri


Article Access Statistics
Viewed
PDF Downloaded
Comments

Share this article!
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Copyright © 2016 The Author(s)
Published by Nickan Research Institute